Category - Holistic Health

1
Holistic Moms Network to host Natural Living Conference
2
How to find balance during fall, the Ayurvedic vata season
3
First Kids Yoga Conference Comes to DC September 27
4
Four easy strategies for de-stressing and filling your cup
5
Healing emotions with Accunect
6
One step at a time: reflections from a holistic health coach (+ giveaway)
7
Lyme Disease: An Epidemic
8
Addressing allergies naturally

Holistic Moms Network to host Natural Living Conference

Holistic Moms Network is a cool enough group for local and online support for living holistically, but it’s even more fun when you get to meet people in person from different chapters around the country. The non-profit organization is holding its annual Natural Living Conference on Saturday, October 25 in New Jersey at Montclair State University just outside of New York City.

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Okay, it’s not in DC, Maryland or Virginia, but it’s only about four hours away. By car. Last year I got to meet some of the leaders from California chapters. They had to be on a plane for more than four hours!

This year’s event is featuring a keynote with Dr. Laura Markham of Aha! Parenting and a screening of the documentary Unacceptable Levels and a Q&A with the film’s director, Ed BrownUnacceptableLevels

 

Breakout sessions include:

At just $55 for the whole day or $40 for a half, the event is a great deal for all the information it will impart as well as the goodie bag treats and all the other samples you’re likely to find in the exhibit hall.  There, parents can learn about wonderful products — food, skin care, and more – and services like Well Amy. One could really spend the entire day in the exhibit hall (and you can do just that for a reduced rate of $20).

The conference is an adult-focused event where babes in arms are welcome. Children may come into the exhibit hall for a reduced price ticket ($10) but need to pay the full rate if they require a seat in the sessions and workshops. The keynote is in the morning and the film screening and Q&A is in the afternoon. Lunch can be purchased separately.

For more information, see annualconference.holisticmoms.organd register at register.holisticmoms.org/

And if you’re looking to make a trip of it, I’m told there is plenty of fall fun to be had in New Jersey, including pumpkin and apple picking. Budding artists might enjoy the Montclair Art Museum, future naturalists will want to explore Brookdale Park and Verona Park, and animal lovers will get a kick out of Turtle Back ZooTripBuzz has a list of Things to Do With Kids in Montclair, NJ, and the New Jersey Mommy Poppins site also has a list of 15 Fun Things to do in Montclair, NJ along with plenty of additional ideas for exploring the area and for weekend happenings.

So take the family up with you if you have a partner, friend or family member who can treat the kiddos to some New Jersey (or even New York City) adventures while you learn lots of wellness tips to nourish your family and connect with other like-minded parents.

Holistic Moms Network has over 100 chapters around the country. In the DC area, there are HMN chapters in Arlington/Alexandria, Northern Virginia (Fairfax) and Loudoun County. The Burke/Springfield chapter will be relaunched soon. Anyone can start a chapter, too. There’s an awesome leader meeting on Sunday, October 26, the day after the conference, so if you’ve been thinking about starting a chapter, now might be a great time to see what that’s like!

 

How to find balance during fall, the Ayurvedic vata season

If you’ve noticed a challenge feeling balanced during these busy back-to-school fall months, the wisdom of the ancient healing science of Ayurveda might shed some light on the cause.

Today’s guest post about fall, the vata season, comes from Ileana Gonzalez of Apurva Ayurveda Healing in Vienna, Virginia.

Although the seasonal change is subtle, it can have a big impact on the mind and body.

As the seasons transition, our mind and our body also experience a transition, as they adjust to the inevitable changes that nature brings with it. This adjustment period is normal, and vital, but it can also lead to certain imbalances if we don’t manage and ease into the transition.

Autumn is known for the decreasing temperatures, the increasing winds, and the overall instability of the weather. Vata, the air and space energy (or dosha), intensifies during this time, leaving our mind and body dry, cold, and unstable.

In our culture, it is normal to start the bulk of our activities during these months. The kids go back to school, they have more activities (sports, schoolwork, and hobbies).

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Your job becomes more demanding with deadlines and objectives. But if you observe nature, you will see that animals actually prepare to wind down and hibernate during the cold months. This anti-nature behavior we adopt actually leads to a lot of imbalances in our mind and body.

Perhaps you have the beginnings of a cold, or maybe you get more frequent headaches and are more moody during this time. Your skin becomes drier, your hand and toes are more sensitive to the cold. All of these things are just a way for your mind/body to adjust to the changing season. Even our cravings change. We crave “comfort” foods like soups, stews, and sweets.

The good news is that our mind and body were designed to adjust to these changes. We just need to “tune in” and manage the adjustment so that it is easy, smooth and hot tealeads to balance. In ayurveda, this management is easy if you apply the simple rule of “like increases like.”

Because vata is cold, dry, light and mobile (unpredictable, unstable), we have to add warmth/heat, oily/unctuous, and predictable/stability to our lifestyles and diets. If you master this principle, your transition from one season to the next will be a lot easier!

Keep this principle in mind when you prepare the kids’ meals/snacks. Choose grounding foods that are heavy, warm, and sweet like rice, sweet potato, and dairy; avoid raw, cold and dry foods. Download this great vata shopping list.

A great way to cut down/prevent on the colds and sniffles kids get this time of year: dab a Q-tip in warm sesame oil and place in the ears and nostrils daily after their bath. This will not only help to keep the area germ-free, it will also lubricate and nourish the area. If your child is prone to vata-like imbalances (dry cough, change in sleep pattern, constipation), try giving him an oil massage using warm sesame oil; the more often you do this, the better. A few minutes before a bath is best, but you can also do it at bedtime.

Something the whole family can practice during this time of year is savasana, or corpse or dead man’s pose. Lie flat on your back, legs and feet apart, palms up at your side. Breathe and surrender for at least 5 minutes. Guaranteed calm! Drink warm milk with a sprinkle of nutmeg, and enjoy a little quiet time before bed. This will help everyone get a good night’s sleep.

As for the grownups in the house, it is normal to feel less concentration, insomnia, and chronic fatigue with the increase in vata energy. For them, I recommend a wonderful vata-pacifying therapy called shirodhara. It is designed to directly activate the ajna chakra, thereby affecting the mind in a profound way. It provides mental clarity, decreases heart rate, decreases blood pressure, and an overall sense of calm and rest. Most people fall asleep during the treatment!

shirodhara

This treatment, as well as other vata-pacifying techniques, is available at Apurva Ayurveda Healing in Vienna, Virginia.

Lastly, don’t forget to increase seasonal fruits veggies—nature’s way of helping us through this transition. Look to squash and root veggies such as sweet potato. Mmmmm. So grounding and nourishing. Try Monica B.’s recipe from Hey Monica B: A Blooming Resource on Ayurveda for Roasted Root Veggies with Garlic & Rosemary.

  • Any mix of root vegetables like butternut squash, potatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots, beets
  • Olive oil
  • Garlic cloves
  • Rosemary sprigs
  • Salt and black pepper to taste

Directions:

  • Chop the root veggies into bite size chunks and place in a pan.
  • Drizzle with plenty of olive oil because when cooked it will caramelize and turn extra yummy.
  • Bake at 350 degrees for 30-40 minutes uncovered

Thanks to Ileana for this guest post!

Updated in October 2017 with Apurva’s new location

For more tips on balancing during vata season, check out these articles at Chopra Centered Lifestyle or Yoganonymous.

First Kids Yoga Conference Comes to DC September 27

The organizers of the first National Kids Yoga Conference are moms who putting their mindfulness skills in practice with every step of planning toward the Saturday, September 27 event at George Washington University’s School of Public Health.

I’ve long admired the work and commitment of lil omm yoga studio owner Pleasance Silicki and Michelle Kelsey Mitchell, co-founder of the Alexandria-based non-profit organization YoKid. When I spoke with them about how they’ve managed to pull off such a huge endeavor, I got even more inspired.

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Four easy strategies for de-stressing and filling your cup

What mom couldn’t use some suggestions on how to feel more grounded, calm and peaceful? Craniosacral therapist Sally DiCesare of Your Blissful Journey recently presented a “Create Your Own Personal Oasis” talk to the Arlington/Alexandria Chapter of Holistic Moms Network, and this Thursday, August 21, she’ll be at the group’s August meeting on a panel about Supporting Children’s Emotional Health. Sally will share how craniosacral therapy can be used with children. But she also wants to remind moms that taking care of their own health is paramount in paving the way for family health.

Here’s a guest post by Sally:

“As Moms, we don’t often ask for help. Many times when we do it’s because we are drowning in overwhelm.

But who has time for a break. And kids’ camps, enrichment and sports aren’t getting any cheaper.

How do you get what you need? Because remember, if the well is empty there is nothing to give.

How do you fill yourself, support yourself, so you have something left to give your family?

HELP!

Fortunately, I’m here with some simple tips to squeeze into your day. Oh, and have your kids join you. They are stressed, too!

Simple Tips from Your Blissful Journey

1. Feeling overwhelmed? Give yourself a hug; an occipital hug.

Remember in the old movies when the man is sitting with his feet propped up on his desk and hands clasped behind his head? Gently place your hands, with fingers intertwined, behind the base of your head, behind your ears, at your occiput. Now just hold your head.

Notice anything? You may feel a pulse. Or take a deep breath or sigh.

This balances your Central Nervous System and is calming and centering.

If I wake in the middle of the night and my mind is working on something so I can’t fall back to sleep, this is my go-to exercise.

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2. Home Reflexology while you multitask

Why does a foot massage feel so good? It is known that certain areas of the foot can stimulate organs of the body. So massaging the foot can actually massage and support the organs and systems in the body. When done in a systematic way, this is called Reflexology. How do you multitask while massaging your feet? Use a tennis or racket ball. When you sit down for dinner, take off your shoes and roll the ball under your foot. If an area is tender, continue there till it feels better. Within a few weeks you will notice subtle improvements in the way you feel as your organs and systems respond to the stimulation and support.

reflexology

3. Bridge to calm

Wake up your internal organs by massaging all the nerves along the spine. This supports all of your body as the nerves innervate all of your organs. Lay on your back on a hard surface such as the floor. Bend your knees so your feet are comfortably close to your buttocks. Slowly curl your back off the floor starting with a pelvic tilt and curl your back off the ground from your pelvis up to your shoulders, one vertebra at a time. Slowly lower your spine from your shoulders to your tailbone. Repeat as often as is comfortable.

 

4. Instant mood lifter: SMILE.woman smiling

Yes, I mean it. Just smile. For better results, try laughing.

I took a Laughing Yoga class at Yogaville. What fun! I never knew there were so many ways to laugh or ways laughter expresses emotion.

Like the laughter of surprise at seeing a friend you haven’t seen in years on the street. Or the chuckle over seeing puppies play.

Practice belly laughs will your kids. See if you can come up with a secret family laugh. Imagine how a giraffe would laugh.

Whatever, have fun with it.

 

Bonus: Close your eyes!

Recover more quickly from illness by resting your eyes as often as possible. Seventy percent of our energy is used by our eyes. Conserve your energy for healing by resting your eyes when home sick by listening to books on tape instead of reading or watching TV.”

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Healing emotions with Accunect

The first time I learned about Accunect, one of the healing modalities that Centreville mother of four Laura Freix uses in her practice, was at the Everyday Health & Wellness Conference this past February. Laura made what seemed like some funny motions around my head, and I tell you, I felt calmer right away and tremendous through the day and beyond!

Accunect Self Care (072614) 040 (1)

Just last week, my children’s doctor told me Accunect would be helpful for me to learn for my children to help them ground and calm.

Two great opportunities are coming up to learn about Accunect. On Thursday, August 21, Laura will be part of a panel at the August evening meeting of the Arlington/Alexandria chapter of Holistic Moms Network on the topic of “Supporting Children’s Emotional Health.”

The following Sunday, August 24, Laura will be teaching a self-care workshop in Centreville, Virginia, 11:30-3:30 p.m.

I asked Laura to explain a little bit more about her work, and here’s what she had to share:

“Accunect is a wonderful healing modality that is based on ancient Chinese medicine and modern neuroscience.  The beauty lies in its simplicity.  In essence, the Accunect system leverages the body’s ability to heal itself by restoring balance.  Unlike most energy healing modalities, which are purely intuitive, the Accunect practitioner uses muscle-checking and a Health Map to guide their intuition, which is a more powerful way to refine intuition.  By looking for areas in the body/mind that are ready to shift for better balance, the balances are generally powerful and long lasting.  Simple tapping is then used to create the shift.  Accunect is great for individuals, families and even pets!

Imagine the following real-life scenarios.  What would you do…

  • if your child was in a state of overwhelm?
  • if you sliced your finger almost to the bone?
  • if something popped in your shoulder as you grabbed your suitcase on your way to the airport and you can’t move your arm more than about five degrees before a knife-like pain radiates down your tendon?
  • if your child came home from practice with a goose egg the size of a tennis ball on her forehead and is leaving for camp the next morning?
  • if you have your first-ever colonoscopy scheduled and don’t want to use anesthesia?
  • if you are out running and your knee locks up, nearly sending you to the ground?
  • if your father had a minor car accident and went into a state of shock?

In all of the above scenarios above, the tools taught in the Accunect SelfCare workshop were used to address the situation without any additional medical intervention. Although that is not always the case, I hope that you now understand why I believe that Accunect® SelfCare is a tool every family should have in their toolbox.

After taking the SelfCare workshop, one mother reported that she has successfully taught her four young children Accunect® SelfCare, empowering the next generation in their own healthcare.

If you want to take it to the next level and learn the system, Accunect Connect is the foundational course.  In Connect, you will build on the principles taught in the SelfCare workshop and be able to do full Accunect healing sessions.  For me, the gift of Connect is learning to tap into your inner guidance system.  As a math major and former senior math analyst with GE Aerospace, I was definitely not in touch with my intuitive brain. Although you are taught to use this in the context of a session, I have found it to be useful in everyday life.  Listening to your body and trusting your internal guidance system are wonderful skills to model for your children.

The other gift of this work is empowerment.  Everyone leaves the workshop with the ability to do the work immediately; it is that simple.  I was able to teach my 10-year old nephew who began doing sessions on his cat (who had recently had a stroke.)  The founder’s son is now six, and he receives some of his best balances from his son.  Kids are great because they don’t have to “un-learn” anything; it simply becomes part of their world.  One girl of nine reported “I don’t know what you do here, but it is like a massage for the mind.”

I originally wanted to learn this work to support my family, but eventually I decided that this work was just too good not to share. I now have my own home business, and a vision for my life after kids, as all but one have left for college and beyond.

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My son will call from the university and ask for distance sessions when he feels the need.  My daughter has a lot of anxiety and did not like talk-therapy; the psychotherapist recommended medication. With Accunect we are able to address underlying belief systems without her having to verbalize or even consciously know what is bothering her.  Another mom did a session on her teenaged daughter, where the belief “People will like me if I am nice,” came up.  A great heart-to-heart talk ensued about “who was she if she wasn’t ‘nice’?” and the difference between being nice so people like you versus being authentic.  Truly a wonderful tool.

I share in the vision of Future Medicine Today to make Accunect a household name.  I hope you will consider attending one of my upcoming SelfCare workshops.  You will find the current workshop schedule under the SelfCare tab of my website www.iEmbraceWellness.com

For more information you can refer to the following links:

www.FutureMedicineToday.com

www.Accunect.com (relatively new; still under development)

Empower yourself; empower your children.  Learn Accunect!”

 

And whenever you do check out a practitioner or a workshop you heard about here, be sure tell them Mindful Healthy Life sent you!

 

One step at a time: reflections from a holistic health coach (+ giveaway)

“It’s June, Mommy!” my 3-year-old daughter announced to me last week. “It was May, and now it’s June!” I’m not sure if she learned this from preschool or from her brother, but it was a delight to see her excitement about something new, even if it had no real meaning to her. It’s hard to believe we’re already almost halfway through the month and just over a week away from the longest day of the year.

June means something special for the author of today’s guest post, mom and holistic health coach Marybeth Walsh of My Whole Self. Marybeth is graciously offering a giveaway of a either a one-hour holistic health coaching session (in person in Alexandria or by phone) or participation in her next two-week seasonal detox program like this one she did in April. (Date TBD: probably in the fall). Each is valued at $125; the winner will be able to choose coaching or the detox program. Enter below!

One Step at a Time in the Path of Life” by Marybeth Walsh

I love the month of June and feel such joy when it arrives. There is an abundance of beauty this month and a feast for the senses. I love the feeling of freedom; the slower pace and promise of more; the colors and scents of flowers, trees, and freshly cut grass; the abundance of ripe, juicy produce; fresh herbs from the garden, and the sounds of kids laughing, free at last.

This year I approach the month of June with mixed feelings. I hit a milestone last June and this year am on the other side, yet life this past year has been full of new challenges. I felt, earlier in my life that by this time, I would have achieved some great measure of wisdom and success. A feeling akin to climbing a steep but beautiful mountain, and finally reaching the top, only to look down from this great height and survey where I’ve been, take a deep breath of accomplishment, and feel peace.

Instead, I was diagnosed with leukemia several years ago and as a result, my life has taken twists and turns I could never have anticipated. Rather than gazing down from the top of the mountain, I feel in many ways I’m starting my climb all over. It reminds me of the game Candy Land, when you hit a slide and get sent back 10 paces.

But I have to say, I’m grateful for all of it: the people who have been in and come into my life, the experiences I’ve had, the knowledge I’ve gained, and the realization that we can always pick ourselves up and start again. I have to say, for every 5 or 10 steps back I take, there has always been new knowledge, friends, inspiration and blessings.

Life is truly a journey, not always straight up, but in a series of peaks and valleys. I think it’s the obstacles and challenges that help us grow and appreciate the goodness in life. What I now know and can share is that we always have a choice, not always with the external situations that hit us, but how we choose to accept them. That being in the present moment, whatever it is, is life. It’s the little things we do each day, our practices, our relationships, and our mindset, that help us navigate the way, guiding us one step at a time.

***

Here are some of Marybeth’s favorite sites and books for healthy inspiration. Share your favorites in the comments — click the button with the dialogue bubble at right — and get another entry into her giveaway!

Marybeth’s Favorite Websites:

Marbybeth’s Favorite Books:


 

Please note that the winner of the giveaway can do an in-person consultation or a phone consultation with Marybeth.
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Lyme Disease: An Epidemic

Lyme disease is on the rise in our area, and it’s something to think seriously about as you head outdoors this season. Untreated Lyme can turn into chronic illness that can take a long time and significant effort to reverse.

May is Lyme Disease Awareness Month, and today’s guest post on Lyme disease is from Shep Saltzman, R.N., L.Ac., of Vienna Complementary Medicine.

What is Lyme disease?  Lyme disease is a bacterial infection transmitted by ticks. The disease is named after Lyme Conn., where a large breakout of Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis occurred. The Rheumatoid Arthritis was caused by a bacterial infection identified as “Borellia Burgdorfi.” Borellia Burgdorfi is carried by tiny deer ticks that feed on the blood of a deer. When a deer tick bites you, it transmits Borellia to you as it feeds on your blood. Once the Borellia gets into our body, it causes Lyme disease.

Lyme disease is reaching epidemic proportions. It is very easy to get Lyme and it takes energy, time money and planning to avoid it.

What is the peak time for Lyme disease? April through October is the peak time for Lyme disease. Cold weather kills many of the ticks that spread the disease. Now is the beginning of the peak Lyme disease season.

Why is Lyme disease occurring more often now? We come in contact with deer more often. The forests and wooded areas that deer live in are being developed. It is common for people to have deer eating their plants, even in suburban subdivisions. One deer can host hundreds of ticks, and as the deer graze and feed near our homes, they spread ticks. The ticks often jump off the deer, and attach to small rodents like squirrels, mice, chipmunks, and our pets.

Small rodents run all over our property, and ticks jump off them, and wait in the grass, bushes and gardens, for us or our pets to happen by, and attach themselves. We can easily be exposed to ticks from our dogs, cats and horses, all of whom can get Lyme disease.

Do all tick bites cause Lyme? No, only ticks that are infected with Borellia. The problem is knowing if a tick is infected. There is a red erythema (bull’s eye) with tick bites that indicates possible Lyme. However, only 50% of the tick bites have a bull’s eye, so the bull’s eye is not reliable.

The tick bites do not hurt, or itch, and most of the time you have no idea you have a tick bite unless it is in a place you can see or someone else can see.

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What are Lyme disease symptoms? The symptoms are vague and like so many other conditions that Lyme disease is called the Great Imitator. Common signs are: migrating joint pain, bulls eye erythema, fever and flu like symptoms, brain fog, headaches, attention disorders, anxiety. See the CDC for signs and symptoms.  Severe Lyme can cause paralysis, loss of voice, debilitating fatigue, and even death.

How is Lyme disease diagnosed? There are several blood tests that identify Lyme disease; the most common is a Western Blot, and another is the Elisa. Both are often inaccurate. They often indicate that you do not have Lyme disease, and you do (known as a false negative). Some tests won’t show Lyme if not enough time has passed. If the test shows positive, it is usually correct.

There are also PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction), LDA (Lyme Dot Blot Assay) and 31 KDA Epitope tests.

There are specialty labs like IGeneX that do Borellia cultures. These tests are much more expensive, but they are the most accurate.

Indirect blood tests like CD4/CD8 and CD57 are good indicators of Lyme. They indicate significant pathogenesis, but they do not specifically identify the pathogen.

It is best to work with a doctor that has extensive experience with Lyme to know what the best tests are for you, if you suspect Lyme or co-infections (described below).

Muscle testing, also known as Applied Kinesiology, is an energy test that can also detect Lyme disease. I always test my patients for Lyme and co-infections, with muscle testing.  I find Lyme often precedes auto-immune conditions like: Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis. Psoriasis, Rosacea, and IBS.

Diagnosis is somewhat difficult, and there is often disagreement amongst doctors and other health care professionals whether someone has Lyme or other  tickborne co-infections.

Do ticks carry other diseases? Yes, Bartonellosis, Babesiosis,  Erlichiosis, Ricketsiosis are all possible co-infections that can occur from the same tick. If a tick has these other infections, they can spread it to you, if you get bit.

How is Lyme disease treated? Initially, in the early stages, antibiotics are effective and are usually prescribed. Unfortunately, the antibiotics are often prescribed for only 2 weeks, and a patient may need 6-8 weeks for the most effective results.

Chronic Lyme, which occurs if Lyme is not treated or diagnosed in a timely manner, is much harder to treat. Antibiotics are prescribed, but additional use of herbs and homeopathic remedies can beused in lieu of antibiotics or in addition to antibiotics. Often herbs and homeopathic remedies are more effective, and sometimes antibiotics are more effective. Sometimes an integrative approach is best.

It does matter which antibiotics are used. There are different types of antibiotics, and many factors affect the correct choice of drug.

Babesia, Bartonella, Rickettsia  and Erlichiosis co-infections require different treatment from Lyme. All these conditions need to be diagnosed and treated. A separate lab test is available for each co-infection.

How can you prevent Lyme Disease? In order to prevent Lyme disease, you must realize that it is spread by contact with ticks. So take prevention seriously.

Lyme - deer tick on q-tip

Deer ticks are very small, so be vigilant about checking all over your body and your children’s bodies after spending time outdoors. The sooner you remove a tick, the better, but it must be done carefully. Tick removal kits and specialized tweezers like Pro-Tick can be purchased online and sometimes at nature centers.

How to remove a tick: Go to http://www.igenex.com/files/should_know.pdf for detailed instructions. Remove it carefully according to these instructions and keep it for possible testing.

And consider the following means for prevention.

1) Pets commonly spread Lyme. Do not allow your pets to sleep in your bed, on even go on your bed. Your pets will have ticks if they go outside, especially if they run free. Examine your pets for ticks, and remove them, whenever you find one. There are vaccinations for pets for Lyme. There are tick collars, and tick sprays.

2) Lawns and gardens can be treated with Permethrine, a chemical that will kill ticks but may be a carcinogen and/or endocrine disruptor, according to Healthy Child Healthy World but that may be less easily absorbed into skin than DEET. Ask an exterminating company about what is available. Lawn maintenance is a very effective way to cut down on the tick population. Keep the grass cut low; ticks do not like sun and get dehydrated by it. Ticks prefer shaded areas like bushes and shrubs. Wear gloves when you garden, and wear shoes and socks as well. Bare skin is what ticks are looking for.

3) Camping and hiking: Many tick prevention sprays that you might spray on clothes contain the poison DEET and may cause eye or skin irritation or more general harm. There are a variety of more natural products you can use on your hands, ankles, neck and behind your ears to avoid tick bites. WebMD has an overview of several products reviewed by Consumer Reports  and has a discussion of more natural products. The Environmental Working Group has a Guide to Bug Repellents that recommends not using a combination repellent and sunscreen.  See also the EWG guide to bug repellents for kids.  Finally, there are also many recipes for DIY bug sprays using essential oils like geranium oil and others , including this tick oil recipe from Primally Inspired

4) Do not attract deer to your property with deer salt-licks and other plants they love. Deer are fun to look at, but they do carry ticks, and those ticks do cause Lyme and other tickborne infections.

5) Do not keep wood piles and leaves on your property anywhere near where you, your children or pets spend time. These are breeding grounds for small rodents and ticks. If you stack firewood for fires, get a metal rack, and stack them carefully and off the ground to minimize breeding of mice, rats and other rodents.

Lyme cannot be spread by saliva but is a bloodborne disease that can be spread through sexual contact.

For information, see:

The information in this article is presented for educational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for medical diagnosis. If you have any concerns about a tick bite, symptoms of Lyme disease or any other health issue, contact your healthcare provider.

shep1About the author:

Shep Saltzman, RN, Licensed Acupuncturist, owns Vienna Complementary Medicine (www.vcmedicine.com) and also sees patients at Vital Mind/Body Therapies in Del Ray, Alexandria.

 

Addressing allergies naturally

The pollen count in the DC area went through the roof last week and will be continuing to climb for at least the next several days, according to both Pollen.com and Weather.com’s Pollen Forecast. Some of us don’t much notice except for the green film on our cars and perhaps a little stuffiness in our nose, which is getting a filtering workout with all the junk in the air.

Others react more strongly. For allergy sufferers, beautiful spring days wreak havoc on our respiratory systems. It can start at any time. For my son, his first experience of allergies was four years ago, when he was five. We’ve been on a journey since the second year to strengthen his system.

If this year’s pollen is causing you troubles, here are some natural remedies you might want to consider to help treat the acute symptoms and also to bolster your immune system and reduce reactivity.

  • Nettle and Eyebright (herbs)
  • Vitamins C and D
  • Elderberry
  • Cod Liver Oil
  • Turmeric
  • Quercitin
  • Essential oils – eucalyptus can help open breathing passages and there are many other oils to help with seasonal allergies
  • Homeopathic blends for allergies, molds, tree pollen, etc. or focus on the specific symptoms and consult a book to see what fits
Taking homeopathy
I always recommend seeking the advice of a trained healthcare practitioner to discuss the right remedies for your child. Ones who use muscle-testing or applied kinesiology might really be able to find the remedy that will yield the best response.
A good practitioner can check for food sensitivities — which might be causing an inflammatory response — as well as other causes for the symptoms. It could be as old as preconceptual or in-utero issues, as I think it is partly with my son, or there could be a reaction to long-term exposure of chemicals, pollutants, mold or even synthetic fragrances. If you have not tried eliminating dairy, that’s a good place to start as it causes lots of people to make extra mucus.
Over-the-counter and prescription allopathic medication might help in the near-term, but if it’s putting undue stress on the liver, it might actually weaken the body’s ability to flush out toxins and could contribute to a worsening of the problem in the long-term.
Natural remedies
Gentle ways to help a child detox include:
  • Starting the day with warm water and lemon, or warm water and a few drops of unfiltered, raw apple cider vinegar
  • Baths with Epsom salt and dead sea salts (use a chlorine filter for the water)
  • Neti pots nasal rinses or nasal sprays — simple saline, xylitol, homeopathic, or those with colloidal silver if you’re comfortable with that
Other modalities that might help include bodywork, such as
  • Acupuncture (some practitioners can use needle-less approaches with children)
  • Osteopathy and craniosacral therapy to calm the central nervous system
  • Chiropractic to address structural issues that may contribute to poor drainage
  • Massage techniques and reflexology

And allergy elimination and energetic techniques like NAET, BioSET, NMT and Total Body Modification can also help reset the body and change its reaction. We’ll be looking for more posts on these alternative measures and will add more links and directory listings in the near future.

Finally, look at your home.

  • Rid your living space of any synthetic fragrance products — especially laundry detergent but also cleaning products
  • Keep the windows closed until the pollen counts go down and wash everyone’s hair as soon as they get inside
  • Consider investing in an air purifier

This is our fourth season with my son’s allergies, the second year we’ve worked ahead of time to prevent them through acupuncture, energetic medicine, bodywork, supplements, air purification, and more.

The duration of his allergies last year was much shorter and the intensity decreased, but he did still have to stay inside for several days and experienced some eye puffiness in addition to redness and tearing. This year, his eyes have still bothered him and have teared some, but so far we have not seen the puffiness of years past, and he’s not had to limit his outside time nearly as much.

My hope is that eventually his system will become strong enough and clean enough that it will not react so severely to the onslaught of air pollutants we get in the springtime. I think my many years of using allopathic allergy and sinus medications only contributed to health problems by artificially masking the symptoms of inflammation while stressing my system even more. A clean diet and other modalities have instead gone after the causes of inflammation.

What works for you?

Copyright © 2015 Mindful Healthy Life. Created by MtoM Consulting.

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